• 2016 Jobs & Development Conference

    November 2-3 | Washington, D.C.

  logos-development-policy-research-unit   logos-institue-for-structural-research       logos-icrier  logos-lacea

Speakers

Achyuta Adhvaryu

Achyuta Adhvaryu is Assistant Professor of Business Economics and Public Policy at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business. His research is in development economics, with particular focus on worker productivity and retention, health care delivery, and early childhood development in low-income contexts. He is affiliated faculty at the National Bureau of Economic Research, the Michigan Population Studies Center, and the Center for Positive Organizations at Michigan. He received his PhD in economics from Yale University in 2009.

Montek Singh Ahluwalia

Montek Singh Ahluwalia was the Deputy Chairman of the Indian Planning Commission, with the rank of Cabinet Minister, from July 2004 to May 2014. Before that he served in the Government of India in a number of senior positions. In 2001, he was appointed the First Director of the newly created Independent Evaluation Office of the International Monetary Fund. He resigned from that position in June 2004, to take up the position of Deputy Chairman, Planning Commission. He started his career in the World Bank in 1968  and left the World Bank in 1979 to join the Government of India as Economic Adviser in the Ministry of Finance. He earned his BA degree in New Delhi and was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University where he earned his MA and MPhil degrees. He was awarded the prestigious “Padma Vibhushan”, India’s second-highest civilian honor, by the President of India in 2011 for his outstanding contribution to economic policy and public service.

Ragui Assaad

Ragui Assaad is a Professor at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota, where he chairs the Global Policy area and co-chairs the Master of Development Practice program. He is a Research Fellow of the Economic Research Forum (ERF) in Cairo since 1994 and currently serves as its thematic leader for Labor and Human Resource Development and as a member of its Board of Trustees. His current research focuses on education and labor markets in the Arab World.

Haroon Bhorat

Haroon Bhorat is Professor of Economics and Director of the Development Policy Research Unit at the University of Cape Town. He has co-authored two books and published over 150 academic journal articles, book chapters and working papers, covering labor economics, poverty and income distribution. He recently co-edited The Oxford Companion to the Economics of South Africa. He is a Non-resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, an Institute for the Study of Labour (IZA) Research Fellow, a Member of the World Bank’s Commission on Global Poverty, and a Member of the UN World Health Organization’s High Level Commission on Health Employment and Economic Growth. He holds a highly prestigious National Research Chair, is an Advisor on the South African Parliament’s High Level Panel on Acceleration of Change and Transformation, and has served as economic advisor to former South African Ministers of Finance. He was also an economic advisor to former Presidents Thabo Mbeki and Kgalema Motlanthe, formally serving on the Presidential Economic Advisory Panel.

Manoel Bittencourt  

Manoel Bittencourt is Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Pretoria and holds a PhD in Economics from the University of Bristol, UK. His research papers have appeared in journals such as Journal of Banking and Finance, Economics of Governance, Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, and Economic Modelling. He is also a National Research Foundation of South Africa-rated researcher, elected member of the Council of the Economic Society of South Africa and affiliated with Economic Research Southern Africa as well as the Universities of Bristol, Goettingen and Heidelberg.

Mariano Bosch

Mariano Bosch is a Senior Specialist at the Labor Markets and Social Security Unit of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). Since joining the IDB in 2011, he has been leading research projects in the area of labor markets, pensions and welfare policies. Prior to joining the Bank, he worked as a consultant for the World Bank and as an assistant professor at the University of Alicante in Spain. He has a PhD in Economics from the London School of Economics.

Miriam Bruhn 

Miriam Bruhn is a Senior Economist in the Finance and Private Sector Development Team of the Development Research Group. She joined the Bank as a Young Economist in September 2007. Her research interests include the effect of regulatory reform on entrepreneurial activity, the informal sector, micro and small enterprises, financial literacy, and the relationship between institutions and economic development. She holds a PhD in Economics from MIT and a BA in Economics from Yale University.

Michał Brzeziński  

Michał Brzeziński is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of Warsaw and Research Fellow at the Institute of Structural Research in Warsaw. His research interests include economic inequalities and poverty in Central and Eastern Poland and the economics of happiness.

Emily Weedon Chapman

Emily Weedon Chapman is a Social Protection Specialist with the World Bank Group.  She focuses on operational and analytic work supporting the realization of social safety net and labor market programming in Sub-Saharan Africa.  Her current work program includes technical assistance to the governments of Zambia and Nigeria on the promotion of productive inclusion.  Previously, she worked largely in fragile and conflict-affected situations, including Liberia, Sierra Leone, and South Sudan.  She holds a master’s degree from the George Washington University.

Nancy Chau  

Nancy H. Chau is a Professor at Cornell University, Research Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) and Senior Research Fellow at the Center for Development Research (ZEF) at the University of Bonn. Her research and teaching programs are in the areas of international and development economics. She was awarded the Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellowship, the International Association of Agricultural Economists’ T.W. Schultz Award, and the SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching. She is currently working on a book entitled Contributions to the Economics of Labor Standards.

Hong Cheng

Professor Hong Cheng is a Professor of Economics and Dean of the Institute of Quality Development Strategy at Wuhan University, the top scientific research institute in the field of quality in China. He also serves as the Director of the Management Committee for the China Employer-Employee Survey, and is the Founding Editor of the Journal of Macro-Quality Research. Areas of research interest include China’s economic transformation, quality of economic development, product quality governance and regulation, and entrepreneurship and innovation. He holds a PhD in Economics from Wuhan University.

Agnieszka Chłoń-Domińczak

Dr. Agnieszka Chłoń-Domińczak is an Assistant Professor at Warsaw School of Economics and Educational Research Institute in Warsaw. Previously she worked in the Ministry of Labour and Social Policy, including the Deputy Minister position, where she was responsible for the coordination of policies in the area of social insurance. She was a member of Social Protection Committee and Employment, Labour and Social Affairs Committee of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. She worked on the Polish pension reform of 1999. Her research interests include demography, pension systems, labor markets, social policy, health, and education.

Homagni Choudhury

Homagni Choudhury is a Lecturer in Economics and the Director of Research for Accounting, Finance, and Economics at the Aberystwyth Business School, Aberystwyth University (UK). Having completed his degree in Economics at the University of Delhi (India), he proceeded onto a master’s program at Lancaster University (UK) and then obtained a PhD in Economics at the University of Dundee (UK). He has a strong background in academia with professional research and teaching experience in a wide range of topics in economics and related areas. His broad research interests lie in the areas of development economics and applied economics with particular interests in international trade, labor, productivity, industrial and regional economics.

Luc Christiaensen

Luc Christiaensen is Lead Agricultural Economist in the World Bank’s Jobs Group. He has written extensively on poverty, structural transformation, and urbanization in Africa and East Asia. He was Co-task Manager of the 2016 World Bank Africa Region flagship report, Poverty in a Rising Africa, and a core member of the team that produced the World Development Report 2008, Agriculture for Development. He holds a PhD in Agricultural Economics from Cornell University.

Bruno Crépon

Bruno Crépon is Professor of Economics at ENSAE ParisTech. He is a board member of the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL), a research network devoted to randomized evaluations of social programs, where he co-chairs the Employment Program and the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) Initiative. Crépon is also an Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) and a Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR) Research Associate. He completed his undergraduate studies at École Polytechnique in Paris and ENSAE, and completed his PhD in Economics at Université de Paris I. His research focuses on program evaluation, especially on employment and youth employment programs in both developed and developing countries.

Guillermo Cruces

Guillermo Cruces (PhD in Economics, LSE) is the Deputy Director of the Center for Distributive, Labor and Social Studies (CEDLAS) at the Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina (UNLP) and a Research Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA). His research is focused on labor economics and distributional analysis in Latin America and the Caribbean. He has published in journals such as the Journal of Political Economy, Journal of Public Economics, Labour Economics, among others, and has edited books and contributed to collective volumes and reports.

Deb Kusum Das

Deb Kusum Das teaches at the Department of Economics, Ramjas College, University of Delhi and is an external consultant with the Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations (ICRIER), New Delhi. His research interests are empirical international trade, labor market, and productivity change. He holds a PhD from the Delhi School of Economics and is the founder of South Asia Economics Students Meet (SAESM), a knowledge sharing platform for undergraduate students of economics of South Asian colleges and universities.

Gretchen Donehower

Gretchen Stockmayer Donehower is a Researcher with the Center on the Economics and Demography of Aging at the University of California, Berkeley.  Through her work with the National Transfer Accounts and Counting Women’s Work Project, she studies the age and gender dimensions of economic activity.  She has a BA in Economics and Mathematics from Yale University, and an MA in Statistics and PhD in Demography from the University of California, Berkeley.

Yang Du

Yang Du is a Professor at the Institute of Population and Labor Economics, Chief of Division of Labor and Human Capital, and Deputy Director of the Research Center for Human Resources at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. He got his PhD in Economics from Zhejiang University in 1999. His main research fields are the labor market in China, economic growth, poverty, and development.

Pablo Egaña del Sol

Pablo Egaña del Sol is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Affective Computing Group and a Postdoctoral Associate in Economics at the Centre for Social Conflict and Cohesion Studies (COES) in Chile. He studies development of socio-emotional, creative, and cognitive skills in educational and labor markets using lab-in-the-field experiments that combine behavioral economics and applied neuroscience. He holds a PhD in Sustainable Development from Columbia University and a BA and MA in Economics from the University of Chile.

John Giles

John Giles is Lead Economist in the Development Research Group (Human Development and Public Services Team). His current research interests include a range of issues related to labor and employment in developing countries, with recent work on school-to-work transitions, population aging, and retirement decisions. He received his PhD in Economics from the University of California, Berkeley. Prior to joining the World Bank in May 2007, he spent two years as an Academy Scholar at Harvard University’s Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, and six years at Michigan State, where he was an Associate Professor.

Tim Gindling

Tim Gindling is Professor of Economics and Public Policy at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC). His research has focused on the study of factors influencing the distribution of wages, income, and work in East Asia and Latin America. Publications include papers in Labour Economics, World Development, Industrial and Labor Relations Review and Latin American Research Review. He is a Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) and has consulted for the World Bank, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, the International Labour Organization and the UN Development Programme, among others.

Markus Goldstein

Markus Goldstein is a Development Economist with experience working in Sub-Saharan Africa, East Asia, and South Asia.  He is currently a Lead Economist in the office of the Chief Economist for Africa at the World Bank, where he leads the Africa Gender Innovation Lab.   His work centers on issues of gender and economic activity, focusing on agriculture and small scale enterprises.  Markus is a Fellow of the Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development (BREAD) and a Co-founder and regular contributor to the Development Impact blog.

Prodyumna Goutam

Prodyumna Goutam is an assistant policy analyst at the RAND Corporation and a doctoral candidate at the Pardee RAND Graduate School.  At RAND, his research work has focused on topics in health and labor economics in developing country contexts.  He holds a master’s degree in Economics from the University of California, Davis, and a bachelor’s degree in Economics from Brandeis University.

Arti Grover

Arti Grover is a Senior Consultant Economist at the World Bank and a Research Associate at Harvard Business School. Her work on international trade and urbanization issues have appeared in leading academic journals, edited volumes, and competitiveness reports. Her work has also been cited widely in popular press, including The Economist and The Financial Times. Prior to joining the Bank in 2009, Arti was a Doctoral Fulbright Fellow at Princeton University and a Lecturer at Delhi School of Economics.

Andrew Guinn

Andrew Guinn is a doctoral student in the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. His research interests include industrial policy, labor market institutions, urbanization, and global value chains. His current research examines technology, skill, and labor market performance in the Brazilian automotive and sugar sectors. He is Co-author of A Indústria Brasileira e as Cadeias Globais de Valor (Brazilian Manufacturing and Global Value Chains).

Anwarul Hoda

A former civil servant, Anwarul Hoda joined the Indian Administrative Service in 1962 and has worked in the Ministry of Commerce in various positions. He has served as Deputy Director General for the Interim Commission of the International Trade Organization (ICITO)/General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), Deputy Director General for the World Trade Organization (WTO), and as a Member of the Planning Commission for the Government of India. He is currently the Chair Professor of Trade Policy at the Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations (ICRIER). His publications include “Trade Negotiations and Renegotiations under the GATT and the WTO” and, as co-author, WTO Negotiations on Agriculture and Developing Countries.

Pamela Jiménez-Fontana

Pamela Jiménez-Fontana is an economist and demographer. She graduated from University of Costa Rica with a bachelor’s degree in Economics and a master’s degree in Health Economics and Population. After working as a professor in economics and researcher in the Central American Center of Population, she studied at the University of California, Berkeley, where she obtained an MA in demography. Currently, she works as a researcher at the Central American Population Center as part of the National Transfer Accounts Project.

Paweł Kaczmarczyk

Pawel Kaczmarczyk is the Director of the Centre of Migration Research at the University of Warsaw and an Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Economic Sciences at the University of Warsaw.  He is a Research Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) as well as a Fellow at the Transcontinental Forum on Migration and Integration (TFMI). His main research areas include causes and consequences of labor migration, highly skilled mobility, methodology of migration research, labor economics, population economics and demography, international economics, and migration policy. He is the author of many publications concerning these areas.

Rajat Kathuria

Rajat Kathuria is Director and Chief Executive at the Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations (ICRIER), New Delhi. He has over 20 years of experience in teaching and economic policy, including research interests on a range of issues relating to regulation and competition policy. He has worked with the World Bank, Washington, DC, as a Consultant and carried out project assignments for a number of international organizations including the International Labour Organization, UN Conference on Trade and Development, LirneAsia, World Bank and Asian Development Bank. He has published in international and national journals, as well as popular magazines and newspapers. He currently is an independent director on several government and non-government committees.

Roma Keister

Roma Keister is a Researcher at the Institute for Structural Research (IBS) based in Warsaw, Poland. She is a PhD student at the Warsaw School of Economics. Her research and academic work at IBS is focused on the influence of technological progress on the labor market, labor market segmentation, and the gender pay gap in Poland and Europe.

Safia Khan

Safia Khan is an Economist and Researcher at the Development Policy Research Unit based at the University of Cape Town. She has a master’s degree in Economics from the University of Cape Town, and a master’s degree in Econometrics and Mathematical Economics from Tilburg University, Netherlands.  Safia is particularly interested in work involving labor markets, gender equality, and poverty reduction in African economies with a pro-poor, pro-development focus. Central to her work are policy and regulatory applicability.

Felipe Larraín Bascuñán

Felipe Larraín was Chile´s Finance Minister (2010-2014), and Vice President (February 2014). He earned his PhD (1985) and MA (1983) in Economics from Harvard University, and has vast experience as an international consultant, academician, and editor.  He is the author of 12 books and 120 professional articles, published in Latin America, the US, Europe and Asia.

He is currently Director of the Latin American Center for Economic and Social Policies (CLAPES UC) and Professor of Economics at UC Chile. From 1997 to 1999 he was the Robert F. Kennedy Visiting Professor of Latin American Studies at Harvard. He has served as an economic advisor to Bolivia, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, Chile, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Perú, and Venezuela. He has acted as a consultant to the UN, the World Bank, the IADB, the IMF, and has also been a board member of several companies and institutions in Chile, Latin America, the US and Europe. In 2014 he joined the UN´s Leadership Council on Sustainable Development (SDSN) and the World Bank´s Doing Business Advisory Board.

Among his awards and honors: named one of 100 Most Influential World Leaders (AACSB, 2015); best sovereign bond issue 2012-13 (Latin Finance, 2014); Vice President of the OECD Ministerial meeting (Paris, 2012);  2010 Finance Minister of the Year for Latin America and the Americas (The Banker, Emerging Markets, Latin Finance, and America Economia); 2010 Economist of the Year (El Mercurio); 2002 Alumnae of the Year (UC); award for distinguished service as Economic Advisor to the President of Bolivia (1986); Raúl Yver Award to the best student in his class at UC (1980); Luis Cruz Martínez Award to the student with the highest score of the Chilean Universities Admissions Exam and the best high school transcript of Chile (1976).

Born in Santiago, Chile, in 1958, he is married and the father of five children.

Piotr Lewandowski

Piotr Lewandowski is a Labor Economist, President of the Board at Institute for Structural Research (IBS), Warsaw, Poland, and a Research Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in Bonn, Germany. In the past he collaborated with Warsaw School of Economics and the Ministry of Labour and Social Policy in Poland. His research interests include minimum wage, temporary contracts and labor market segmentation, influence of technology on jobs, pensions and social policy, transition economies, and labor market effects of climate and energy policies.

Yanan Li

Yanan Li is a PhD candidate at the Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management. Her research experience mainly relates to social safety nets, including minimum wages, health insurance and chronic disease in China, unemployment in the US, and the National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (NREGS), a public works program in India.

Francisco Lima

Francisco Lima is a PhD candidate in Economics at the Graduate School of Economics at Getulio Vargas Foundation (FGV/EPGE). His primary research interests are Environmental and Agricultural Economics and Development Economics. He is also working as field coordinator of the Bahia Sustainable Rural Development Project, a World Bank project.

Giulia Lotti

Giulia Lotti is Research Associate at the Centre for Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE) in the Department of Economics at the University of Warwick. She currently focuses on labor markets of the Andean region and previously worked as a consultant for the World Bank. Her research interests include applied microeconomics, labor economics, and the economics of crime. Giulia holds a PhD in Economics from the University of Warwick and a master of science degree in Economics from University College London (UCL).

Mario Macis

Mario Macis is Associate Professor of Economics at the Johns Hopkins University Carey Business School. He is also a Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) and the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA). His research interests are in labor economics, health economics, development economics, and pro-social behavior. His research has received several competitive grants, including grants from the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and the World Bank’s Strategic Impact Evaluation Fund. He has been a consultant for the World Bank, the International Labor Organization, and the National Marrow Donor Program.

Iga Magda

Iga Magda holds a PhD in Economics. She serves as the Vice President of the Management Board at the Institute for Structural Research (IBS, Warsaw) and as Assistant Professor at the Warsaw School of Economics.  She previously worked at the Ministry of Labour and Social Policy, coordinating research projects and participating in European Union/ Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) working parties on employment and social affairs. Her research is focused on the labor market, education, and social policy, including family policies. She has authored and co-authored numerous publications in these fields.

Aly Mbaye

Dr. Aly Mbaye is a Professor of Economics at the University Cheikh Anta Diop (UCAD) in Dakar, Senegal. He previously served as the Dean of Faculty of Economics and Management at UCAD. He holds a doctorate in Development Economics from the University of Clermont Ferrand in France and has held several international academic positions, including Fulbright Professor at Swarthmore College and George Washington University, Cornell Visiting Professor at Swarthmore College, and Research Visiting Scholar in the Research Department of the World Bank.

Ellen McCullough

Ellen McCullough is an Assistant Professor in the Agricultural and Applied Economics Department at the University of Georgia. Her research focuses on structural change in African economies, labor productivity, time use, and occupational choices. Before returning to academia, Ellen worked as an Associate Program Officer in Agricultural Development at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and as an economist at the UN Food and Agriculture Program. She holds a PhD in Applied Economics and Management from Cornell University and BS and MS degrees in Earth Systems from Stanford University.

Ali Mehdi

Ali Mehdi is a Fellow at the Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations (ICRIER), where he has established and led the Jobs for Development project and the Health Policy Initiative. Ali has had extensive international research experience, earning his MA from the University of Freiburg and his PhD from Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and has conducted field research in the US, Canada, UK, Germany, Switzerland, Japan, Singapore, China, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, and South Africa. He is currently working on three books, due to appear by 2017, on the topics of focal variables for priority-setting in health policy, chronic diseases in South Asia, and the India Health Report 2017.

Teresa Molina

Teresa Molina is a PhD candidate in Economics at the University of Southern California (USC). Her recent research seeks to understand how the early life health environment affects human capital accumulation in the long run, primarily in developing countries. She graduated from Stanford University with a BA in Economics in 2009 and started the PhD program at USC after two years of working in health policy research.

Andrés Moya

Andrés Moya is an Assistant Professor in the Economics Department at Universidad de Los Andes in Bogotá, Colombia. He has a PhD in Agricultural and Resource Economics from the University of California, Davis. His research agenda focuses on the economic, psychological, and behavioral consequences of violence and forced displacement in Colombia. Currently, he is analyzing the behavioral consequences of violence on early childhood and adolescents, and leading a project that aims to protect children in the context of violence in Colombia through a group-based psychosocial program for victimized mothers that combines trauma and attachment theories.

Karmen Naidoo

Karmen Naidoo is currently pursuing a PhD in Economics at the University of Massachusetts–Amherst.  She is a Research Associate at the Development Policy Research Unit at the University of Cape Town and has worked extensively in profiling, through the use of micro-datasets, poverty, inequality, and labor markets in selected African economies.

Njuguna Ndung’u

Njuguna Ndung’u is an Associate Professor of Economics and the immediate former Governor of the Central Bank of Kenya, serving from 2007 to 2015. He is credited with paving the way for the mobile banking revolution in Kenya, which has had a dramatic impact on financial inclusion. He was the Chair of Alliance for Financial Inclusion (AFI) in its first four formative years between 2009 and 2012, which has coordinated financial inclusion solutions in Africa, Asia and Latin America. AFI has been described as a clearing house for policy solutions that have worked and can be replicated with ease in other countries for financial inclusion. He was the Director of Training at the African Economic Research Consortium (AERC), Regional Programme Specialist for the Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Office, Nairobi, of the International Development Research Centre (IDRC), Canada, and a Principal Analyst and Researcher at the Kenya Institute of Public Policy Research and Analysis (KIPPRA).

Stephen O’Connell

Stephen D. O’Connell is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He graduated with a PhD in Economics from the City University of New York (CUNY) Graduate Center in 2016 with specializations in development and labor economics. His current work focuses on the long-term and spillover effects of quota policies in politics.

Morné Oosthuizen

Morné Oosthuizen is Deputy Director of the Development Policy Research Unit (DPRU) located within the School of Economics at the University of Cape Town. His research interests include intergenerational transfers, poverty, inequality, and labor economics. He holds a master’s degree in Economics from the University of Stellenbosch, and is currently completing his PhD at the University of Cape Town on the topic of intergenerational transfers and National Transfer Accounts in South Africa.

Ana Maria Oviedo

Ana Maria Oviedo is a Senior Economist in the Poverty and Equity Global Practice of the World Bank where she leads technical and policy dialogue on poverty, inequality, labor markets, and social protection with governments in Latin America. She was part of the World Development Report 2014: Risk and Opportunity, where she led the chapter on household risk management. She has conducted research on a broad range of topics, including skills, education quality, employment, informality, labor and product market regulation, and productivity. She holds a PhD in Economics from the University of Maryland.

Pierella Paci

Pierella Paci is Lead Economist in the Poverty Global Practice. She joined the World Bank after an established career as an academic in the UK and in her 15-year career at the World Bank Group, Pierella has held technical, operational, and management positions in different regions and key corporate roles.  She has published extensively in the areas of labor, gender, poverty, and inequality and has been instrumental in developing the World Bank corporate agenda in these areas. She holds a Laurea in Economics from the Universita’ la Sapienza in Rome and PhD in Economics from the Victoria University of Manchester.

Albert Park

Albert Park is the Director of the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) Institute for Emerging Market Studies, Chair Professor of Social Science, Professor of Economics, and Senior Fellow of the Institute for Advanced Study at HKUST.  He is also a Research Fellow of the Center for Economic Policy Research (CEPR), the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group (HCEO), and the International Growth Centre (IGC).   He is a Development and Labor Economist whose research focuses on the Chinese economy. In recent years, he has published articles on poverty and inequality, migration and employment, health and education, the economics of aging, and firm performance in China. He has played a key role in major survey research projects in China, including the China Employer-Employee Survey, the China Urban Labor Survey, the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study, and the Gansu Survey of Children and Families. His is Co-Editor-in-Chief of the China Economic Review (from 2017) and on the editorial boards of the World Bank Economic Review and the Journal of Comparative Economics. He completed his PhD at Stanford University and previously held faculty positions at the University of Michigan and the University of Oxford.

Jorge Eduardo Pérez Pérez

Jorge E. Pérez Pérez is a PhD candidate in Economics at Brown University. His current research is on urban and labor economics, with a focus on minimum wages and place-based policies. He has published on-demand analysis in Colombia and fiscal policy in Latin America. Before Brown, he was a Research Fellow at the Inter-American Development Bank, and a Researcher and Adjunct Professor at Universidad del Rosario in Bogotá, Colombia. A Colombian citizen, he holds a MA in Economics from Brown University, and bachelor’s degrees in Economics and Finance from Universidad del Rosario.

Nathalie Picarelli

Nathalie Picarelli is a PhD student at the London School of Economics. Her research focuses on topics related to urban inequalities with a strong focus on policy evaluation. Her current projects include studying segregation, transport, and housing policies in urban South Africa, analyzing informal transportation networks in Accra, Ghana, and looking at the effect of climate change and informality on disease transmission in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. She has an MRes from Sciences Po Paris and an MPA from Columbia University. She previously worked at the World Bank where she focused on public debt and growth issues in Caribbean countries.

Cecilia Poggi

Cecilia Poggi is a PhD candidate in Economics at the University of Sussex and member of the Sussex-Mahidol Migration Partnership (SMMP). She recently collaborated to the World Bank’s Systematic Country Diagnostics report for Thailand on the labor market, poverty, and inclusive growth components. Her research interests are in labor economics, migration, poverty, and income distribution. Cecilia will be in the job market in summer 2017.

María Prada

María Fernanda Prada is a Senior Associate in the Education Division of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). Her research focuses on the intersection between skills, education, and labor market outcomes. She also has experience in technical and vocational education, institutional architecture of skills systems, evaluation of public policies, and poverty. She has worked as a consultant for the IDB’s Labor Markets and Social Security Division, and as a research assistant for the IDB, the World Bank, and the University of the Andes in Bogotá. She holds a master’s degree from the University of the Andes and a PhD in Economics from the University of Maryland, College Park.

Laura Ralston

Laura Ralston is an Economist in the Social Protection and Labor practice of the World Bank, where she works on social insurance, human development, and labor markets. She has an interest in development in fragile and conflict prone environments and works on projects in several Fragile and Conflict Affected Situation (FCS) countries in Africa. She has contributed to the work of the World Bank’s Fragility, Conflict and Violence (FCV) group by tracking progress and identifying challenges for projects and programs in these environments. She works to develop collaborations across the World Bank and with external partners, with a focus on innovation and sharing of ideas. Towards these goals, she has coordinated impact evaluations across sectors in Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, South Asia, and East Asia, and has performed conflict and fragility analysis and monitoring in Africa and the Middle East.

Martin Rama

Martin Rama is the Chief Economist for the South Asia region of the World Bank, based in Delhi. He previously served as the Director of the World Development Report 2013: Jobs and as the Lead Economist for Vietnam, based in Hanoi. Previously, for eight years, he was the Lead Economist for Vietnam, based in Hanoi. Prior to moving to operations, he spent ten years with the Research Department of the World Bank. He gained his degree in Economics from the Universidad de la República in Uruguay and his PhD in Macroeconomics from the Université de Paris I in France.  Back in his home country of Uruguay, he worked at el Centro de Investigaciones Económicas (CINVE), the country’s largest think tank. In parallel with his World Bank duties, he was visiting professor at the graduate program in Development Economics at the Université de Paris I until 2005.

Vijaya Ramachandran

Vijaya Ramachandran is a Senior Fellow at the Center for Global Development. She works on private-sector development, financial flows, food security, humanitarian assistance, and development interventions in fragile states. Most recently, she coauthored an essay titled “Development as Diffusion: Manufacturing Productivity and Africa’s Missing Middle,” published in the Oxford Handbook on Economics and Africa. Currently, she is looking at the unintended consequences of rich countries’ anti-money laundering policies on poor countries, and at better ways to deliver humanitarian assistance.

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Marco Ranzani

Marco Ranzani is an Economist in the World Bank’s Poverty and Equity Global Practice. He previously served as a Researcher at Understanding Children’s Work, an inter-agency research cooperation initiative involving the International Labour Organization (ILO), UNICEF, and the World Bank, and as a Post-doctoral Fellow at the University of Bergamo, Italy. His main research interest is empirical microeconomics, with a focus on the analysis of labor market issues, poverty, and inequality. He holds a PhD in Public Economics from the Catholic University of Milan.

Tomás Rau

Tomás Rau is an Associate Professor of Economics at Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. He holds a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley. His research focuses on econometrics, development, and labor economics. His current research interests include matching methods for causal inference, peer effects in the adoption of social programs, and topics at the intersection of environmental and development economics such as the effect of hazardous waste exposure on cognitive and noncognitive skills in early childhood and long run outcomes.

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Martin Ravallion

Martin Ravallion holds the inaugural Edmond D. Villani Chair of Economics at Georgetown University, prior to which he was the Director of the World Bank’s Research Department. He has advised numerous governments and international agencies on poverty and policies for fighting it, and has written extensively on this and other subjects in economics, including five books and over 200 papers in scholarly journals and edited volumes. His latest book, The Economics of Poverty: History, Measurement and Policy, was published by Oxford University Press in 2016. He is President of the Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, a Senior Fellow of the Bureau for Research in Economic Analysis of Development, a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, USA, and a non-resident Fellow of the Center for Global Development. Amongst various prizes and awards, in 2012 he was awarded the John Kenneth Galbraith Prize from the American Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, and in 2016 he received a Frontiers of Knowledge Award from the BBVA Foundation.

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Carlos Rodríguez-Castelán

Carlos Rodríguez-Castelán is a Senior Economist and Global Lead for Markets and Institutions in the Poverty and Equity Global Practice at the World Bank. He previously was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Brookings Institution and worked for the Government of Mexico. He also held short-term research positions at the UN Economic Commission for Latin America and the Research Department of the Inter-American Development Bank. His research interests are in the fields of development economics and public economics. He holds a PhD and MA in Economics from Cornell University and a MPP and BA in Economics and Political Science from the Mexico Autonomous Institute of Technology (ITAM).

Jose Romero

Jose M. Romero has over 10 years of professional experience in economics research including work with the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and the International Labour Organization. He specializes in development economics and applied microeconometrics. His research has focused on labor market participation and youth employment, transport infrastructure, and access to formal financial services. He is fluent in English and Spanish and holds MA and MPhil degrees from the George Washington University and bachelor degrees in Anthropology and Economics (Statistics minor) from the University of Florida.

Lucas Ronconi

Lucas Ronconi is Director of Research at Centro de Investigación y Acción Social (CIAS) in Argentina. He has published extensively in academic and policy journals in the areas of development, labor markets and political economy.  Lucas holds a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley.

Héctor Gutiérrez Rufrancos

Héctor Rufrancos is a Research Fellow in Historical Economics at the University of Sussex where he works on the Global Income Inequality Project, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council. He is currently a PhD candidate in Economics at Sussex and was previously a Research Fellow at the Equality Trust. His main areas of research are labor economics, political economy, and historical economics.

Prabirjit Sarkar

Prabirjit Sarkar is from Kolkata (Calcutta), India and is currently a Professor of Economics at Jadavpur University. He is also working with the Centre for Business Research at the University of Cambridge on various issues relating to law and economics with UK-based scholars. His recent works regarding law and economics have been published in The Journal of Industrial Relations, Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, Cambridge Journal of Economics, and the International Labour Review of the International Labour Organization.

Kunal Sen

Kunal Sen is Professor of Development Economics in the Global Development Institute at the University of Manchester and a Joint Research Director at Effective States and Inclusive Development (ESID) Research Centre.  His area of research is informality, economic growth, and political economy. He won the Sanjaya Lall Prize in 2006 and the Dudley Seers Prize in 2003 for his publications.

Francois Steenkamp

Francois Steenkamp has a master’s degree in Economics from the University of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa and is currently working on his PhD at the University of Cape Town (UCT).  His PhD research focuses on South African export patterns and the developmental implications of these export patterns.  He has also spent time working as a lecturer at the UCT School of Economics where he taught international trade and macroeconomics.  His research interests include international trade, development economics and labor economics.

Nick Tsivanidis

Nick Tsivanidis is a 5th year Economics PhD student at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. His dissertation research evaluates the impact of Bus Rapid Transit on aggregate productivity and inequality in Bogotá, Colombia. More broadly, his interests lie in studying the process of urbanization in developing countries. Other projects include using satellite images to evaluate the impact of the redevelopment of Mumbai’s textile mills, assessing the impact of social networks in the process of migration and urban integration using cellphone data in Uganda, and studying the effect of contract labor on manufacturing productivity in India.

Gabriel Ulyssea

Gabriel Ulyssea holds a PhD in Economics from the University of Chicago. Before his PhD, he worked as an Economic Advisor for the Ministry of Finance and as a tenured Researcher at the Institute for Applied Economic Research (IPEA). After concluding his PhD, he returned to IPEA before joining the Economics Department at the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro as an Assistant Professor. His research areas are labor and development economics.

Sergio Urzúa

Sergio Urzúa is an Associate Professor in Economics at the University of Maryland. He is also a National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) Research Associate, Research Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) and International Research Fellow at Clapes-UC. His research focuses on the role of abilities, skills, and uncertainty as determinants of schooling decisions, labor market outcomes, and social behavior. His research in econometrics analyzes selection models with unobserved heterogeneity. His research agenda includes the evaluation of social programs in developing economies. He teaches Labor Economics and Econometrics.

Pankaj Vashisht

Dr. Pankaj Vashisht is a Fellow at the Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations (ICRIER). He specializes in the field of industrial economics, international trade, labor economics, and applied econometrics. He has numerous publications which include a book on the competitiveness of the Indian auto industry, chapters in edited volumes, papers in refereed journals, and working papers. He has also presented his research at various international conferences.  He holds a PhD in Economics from Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi.

Mariana Viollaz

Mariana Viollaz has a PhD in Economics from the Universidad Nacional de La Plata (UNLP), Argentina. She is a Senior Researcher at the Center for Distributive, Labor and Social Studies (CEDLAS), at UNLP which is specialized in the development of empirical evidences based on micro-data from household surveys of Latin American countries. Currently, she is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Industrial and Labor Relations School of Cornell University where she is doing research on the growth-employment-poverty nexus in Latin America during the 2000s. Her research is focused on labor and development economics in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Jackline Wahba

Jackline Wahba is a Professor of Economics at the University of Southampton. She is a member of the UK Migration Advisory Committee (MAC). She has substantial experience in international migration and labor markets and has published in several leading economics journals. She leads the migration strand within the Economic and Social Research Council-funded Centre for Population Change (CPC) at Southampton. She is a Research Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), the Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), and the Economic Research Forum (ERF), and the Managing Editor of the IZA Journal of Labor and Development.

Xianjia Ye

Xianjia Ye is a PhD candidate in the Faculty of Economics and Business at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. He has obtained his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Economics, also from Groningen. His research interests are international trade and labor economics with a focus on the implications of offshoring and global value chains on technical change, structural change, and the labor demand.

Xiaobo Zhang

Xiaobo Zhang is a “One Thousand Talented Scholars Program” Chair Professor of Economics at the National School of Development, Peking University. His research fields include the Chinese economy, agricultural economics, and development economics. He has published widely in top economics journals, such as the Journal of Political Economy, the Journal of Development Economics, the Journal of International Economics, and the Journal of Public Economics. He received the Sun Yefang Prize for Economics Research, the most prestigious award in the field of economics in China.

Klaus Zimmermann

Klaus F. Zimmermann is Visiting Professor at the Economics Department of Princeton University; Co – Director of the Center for Population, Development and Labour Economics at UNU – MERIT, Maastricht; Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Population Economics; Honorary Professor at the Free University of Berlin and at the Renmin University of China, Beijing; Full Professor of Economics at Bonn University (on leave); Member of the Leopoldina, the German National Academy of Sciences, and of the Academia Europaea, the European Academy of Sciences, and Chair of its Section for Economics, Business and Management Sciences; Research Fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research; and Fellow of the European Economic Association.

Among his previous positions have been: Visiting Professor and John F. Kennedy Memorial Policy Fellow at the Center for European Studies, Harvard University; Founding Director of the Institute for the Study of Labor; President of the German Institute for Economic Research; Professorships at University of Pennsylvania, Munich University, Kyoto University and Dartmouth College, among others. He has received the Distinguished John G. Diefenbaker Award 1998 of the Canada Council for the Arts and the Outstanding Contribution Award 2013 of the European Investment Bank.

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The Network on Jobs and Development is a partnership of five research institutions that is financed by the Development Grant Facility and sponsored by the World Bank Jobs Group.